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Pedestal vs. Submersible Sump Pumps: Usage Applications & Differences

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What’s a Primary Sump Pump?

Your house isn’t just a house—it’s a fortress against water damage when you’ve got an effective primary sump pump setup. A sump pump is a device that keeps groundwater runoff, storm surges, and seasonal flooding from filtering down into your basement. Time and time again, homeowners fall victim to water damage because they didn’t schedule maintenance ahead of the rainier seasons. To help you prevent mold growth and water damage, we have created an outline of the differences between pedestal vs. submersible sump pumps. Utilize our tips to choose a type of sump pump for your home.

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Pedestal vs. Submersible Sump Pumps

How a Submersible Sump Pump Operates

Unlike pedestal sump pumps, submersible sump pumps run while being “submerged” underwater, so they are placed in a deeper sump pit. If you are comparing the advantages of pedestal vs submersible sump pumps, a submersible pump is designed to make less noise because it operates beneath the water. Since this type of pump is configured below the water, it is less likely to overheat in comparison to other types of sump pumps.

Not only does a submersible sump pump push out water, but it also pumps gunk and other debris out of your sump pit. It has a high horsepower rating because it can carry more gallons of water out of your house than pedestal sump pumps. It also manages to do so over great distances and elevation. All these worthwhile benefits mean that a submersible sump pump is also a costlier investment.

How a Pedestal Sump Pump Works

In the great pedestal vs. submersible sump pump debate, pedestal sump pumps were previously the most popular option. After all, they don’t need a lot of space to run. However, pedestal pumps can become noisy since the motor sits above the water. This also means that it’s at a higher risk of overheating. Pedestal sump pumps made of cast iron tend to last the longest, but keep in mind that they cannot remove any debris sitting in your sump pit. Generally speaking, if the sump pump pit in your basement is too small or shallow, then it’s best to use a pedestal sump pump.

Sump Pump

6 Signs It’s Time to Purchase a New Sump Pump

If you begin experiencing any of the scenarios below, it’s a good idea to get in touch with a licensed plumber to learn more about the benefits of investing in a new sump pump for your basement or crawl space.

Weird Noises

Loud sounds from your sump pump typically indicate broken or worn-out parts. In cases where the fan, propeller, or motor are failing, it might be best to purchase a new submersible or pedestal sump pump. If the entire unit shakes while it’s sucking, shut it off and contact a certified technician before the impeller damages the whole system.

Continuous Operation

Wondering why your sump pump seems to be running all the time? Usually, if the pump is maladjusted within the basin or if the power source is acting up, problems sprout up with the switch and float arm mechanisms. Your sump pump could also be too small for your house. In any case: get it replaced.

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Short Cycling

Rather than working constantly, do you find that your sump pump keeps shutting on and off? Even while it’s raining hard outside? This tends to happen when the pump wiring is creating an electrical short. As soon as you notice this occurring, let us know so we can repair or replace it.

Rust and Damage

Rust or other damage on a sump pump won’t necessarily put you or your family’s health at risk, but the wear and tear could mean trouble for the water trying to properly drain out of the system. If you notice rust in your system, this is an indicator you need to purchase a new pedestal or submersible sump pump. Rust can emerge from battery terminal corrosion or bacteria build-up.

Objects & Materials in the Motor

A licensed technician will recommend installing a filter for your sump pump, especially if it tends to pick up a lot of sediment. This should prevent premature breakdown, but you’ll need to perform filter maintenance such as cleaning and replacement.

Sump Pump Has Received Minimal Use

Just like a car battery, if your sump pump doesn’t get used, it’s all the more likely to fail when you need it most. Keep it ready at a moment’s notice by occasionally testing your sump pump. As long as it appears to be in good working condition, it should do the job.

Technician

Sump Pump Repair & Replacement Services

Know exactly how your sump pump is doing before the next downpour and schedule an appointment with an emergency plumber from Snell Heating and Air Conditioning. Find us here or at (703) 543-9649 so we can perform high-quality sump pump repair, installation, or replacement services. In addition, our team of local plumbers offers other types of plumbing services including drain cleaning, sink installation, gas line replacement, water heater repair, and sewer line installation. We’re available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and 365 days a year. With our team by your side, there’s no way we’re letting expensive water damage get through.

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